How To Make Digital Proximity Tracing Work: The View from Economics

How To Make Digital Proximity Tracing Work: The View from Economics

Covid-19 proximity tracing apps can contribute to the fight against the pandemic. In a free society, however, their adoption is impossible to enforce by decree or material incentives. Their success therefore hinges on voluntary cooperation. We show that activating the app has considerable private benefits that many may underestimate – especially by offering information to guide their behavior towards vulnerable relatives and friends. Hence, activating the app need not primarily be seen as an act of social generosity. Alerting contacts through the app after having tested positive, however, presents a tradeoff of private costs against societal benefits. We argue that these private costs are likely to be negligible for most users, while the social benefits (saving lives) are potentially large.

 

Fast and local: how did lockdown policies affect the spread and severity of Covid-19?

Fast and local: how did lockdown policies affect the spread and severity of Covid-19?

How have the responses of governments around the world to this Covid-19 crisis impacted the development of the global pandemic?
More precisely, the authors analyse whether lockdowns mitigated the surge in infections and reduced mortality, which type of lockdown measure works best, and how effective lockdowns have been in developing vs developed countries.

 

How Reskilling Can Soften the Economic Blow of Covid-19

How Reskilling Can Soften the Economic Blow of Covid-19

In the early months of 2020, millions of workers worldwide were laid off as the Covid-19 pandemic shuttered entire industries. Yet not all industries suffered contractions: the healthcare sector, for instance, saw demand grow, as did schools, in some parts of the world, and online retail. Under normal conditions, workers constantly shift between different industries, albeit at a slow pace. However, the Covid-19 pandemic created an urgent need to make labor shifts happen much more quickly.

Article published in the Harvard Business Review